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Saudi Aramco computer network attacked by virus, operations unaffected

08.16.2012  | 

The disruption is suspected to be the result of a virus that had infected personal workstations without affecting the primary servers and components of Saudi Aramco's network, the company said on Thursday. Saudi Aramco produced an average of 9.1 million bpd of oil last year.

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By JACOB GRONHOLT-PEDERSEN

A serious computer virus that late Wednesday forced the world's largest oil producer, Saudi Arabian Oil Co., to isolate all its electronic systems from outside access left the company's operations unaffected, the company said Thursday morning.

“The company has isolated all its electronic systems from outside access as an early precautionary measure that was taken following a sudden disruption that affected some of the sectors of its electronic network,” Saudi Aramco said in a statement.

“The interruption has had no impact whatsoever on any of the company's production operations,” it said.

The disruption is suspected to be the result of a virus that had infected personal workstations without affecting the primary servers and components of Saudi Aramco's network, the company said.

Saudi Aramco produced an average of 9.1 million bpd of oil last year.


Dow Jones Newswires



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Isra
03.12.2013

I am also skeptical of a sueddn drop in Saudi production, but equally so of anything above their previous peak.Also, they have a very brisk pace of internal consumption growth which limits their net exports.The Oil shock of '08 did not come, as might be thought from the wording, as a shock. It was a shock in terms of effects but not in the way it arrived, which sets it apart from the 70s shocks.Remember, back in '06, the world was still learning to deal with oil around 50-60 dollars per barrel on a consistent basis. Prices crept up incrementally for a number of years and if the Saudis indeed did have all that reserve capacity which we've all been told for years then, again, why did they fail to use it in the first months of 2008 and ahead until the early summer of that same year?Unless you think they were clumpsy or acted in a conspiracy to bring the world economy down, there has to be a rational(at least from their narrow national, or geologial, perspectice) reason for this.Yes, it takes time to produce new oil but Aramco has some of the best people employed by them from overseas and they've been in the business for a very long time now. If laymen like us can predict rough oildemand and what's needed to meet it based on production data from across the world, it would be foolish to think that Aramco can't, given all their genuine expertise and massive resources at hand.I'm sorry, there are too many inconsistencies to just accept flatly out of hand for me to drop this on it's face and just carelessly move on.Saudi Arabia continues to be the puzzle of which the Peak Oil event, when it will occur and how serious, continues to hinge upon. And while I didn't dabble in Simmons' prophecies of doom, I still found it closer to the mark than the conventional wisdom spouted by the MSM and the Saudis themselves(Perhaps the most amusing one was the Economist statement in 2006).

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