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Shell proceeds with Alberta oil sands CO2 capture

09.05.2012  | 

Starting in late 2015, Quest will capture and store deep underground more than 1 million tpy of carbon dioxide produced during the bitumen processing, reducing direct emissions from the upgrader by up to 35%. Shell Canada owns 60% of the joint venture, which also includes Chevron and Marathon Oil.

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By CAROLYN KING

Royal Dutch Shell’s Canadian unit said Wednesday it will proceed with the proposed Quest carbon capture and storage project, the first such commercial-scale project to tackle carbon emissions in the Alberta oil sands.

Shell said the project will be built on behalf of the Athabasca oil sands project joint-venture owners, which also include Chevron and Marathon Oil.

Shell Canada owns 60% of the joint venture, with the two partners each holding 20%.

The Athabasca joint venture produces bitumen, which is piped to Shell’s Scotford upgrader near Edmonton, Alberta.

Starting in late 2015, Quest will capture and store deep underground more than 1 million tpy of carbon dioxide produced during the bitumen processing, Shell said, reducing direct emissions from the upgrader by up to 35%.

In a statement, Shell didn't disclose the estimated total cost of the Quest project, though it said the Alberta and Canadian governments will invest 745 million Canadian dollars ($756 million) and C$120 million, respectively, to support the project as part of initiatives to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

The Canadian government has previously put the cost of the Quest project at C$1.35 billion.


Dow Jones Newswires



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cyberclark
09.06.2012

The Athabasca area is uses up as much as it can be. To
get more out of it the area has to be flooded with Carbon
Dioxide and Water. Certainly Shell and the industry has
this in mind as they design the CCS program.

Shipped in "near liquid form" means they are going to save a lot of money in pipeline construction and carbon dioxide collection.

When the CO2 goes beyond a kilometer down it will change to its liquid form regardless of what it started out as.

If this now liquid solvent is going to be used to scarf oil

then, it will return to the surface with the oil releasing on the way up.

This is one project that is worthy of a close watch. It promises a great deal; I wish them well

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