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Texas, California top US states for CO2 emissions from energy industry

05.14.2013  | 

Nearly half of the Lone Star State's 663 million metric tons of CO2 emissions came from petroleum fuels in 2010, according to a Energy Information Administration report. Coal and natural gas use and operations in the state contributed roughly a quarter each of the rest.

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By CASSANDRA SWEET

Texas led US states in carbon dioxide emissions from energy, followed by California and Pennsylvania, according to the latest data.

Nearly half of the Lone Star State's 663 million metric tons of CO2 emissions came from petroleum fuels in 2010, according to a Energy Information Administration report. Coal and natural gas use and operations in the state contributed roughly a quarter each of the rest.

California produced about 370 million metric tons of CO2 in 2010, about two-thirds of it from petroleum fuels and about a third from natural gas, according to the report released last Wednesday.

Nearly half of Pennsylvania's 257 million metric tons of CO2 came from coal, while about a third came from petroleum fuels and about a fifth came from natural gas.

The daily average concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere reached 400 parts per million for the first time, at a benchmark US monitoring site in Hawaii, scientists at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Friday.

Climate scientists said the data were a sign that manmade greenhouse gases were growing, rather than declining, which they predicted could boost global warming and lead to more frequent extreme-weather events, such as droughts, wildfires, floods and rising sea levels.

CO2 emissions from energy dropped in most US states between 2000 and 2010, although emissions rose in Nebraska, Iowa, Colorado, Arizona and other states, according to the EIA.


Dow Jones Newswires



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Jaime Bárcena -México-
08.01.2013

The amount of CO2 emissions to the atmosphere is bigger and it is considered the main agent of green house effect and also contribute to climate change. But it must be taken into consideration the sulfur content in fossil fuels because they produce SO2 and NOx together. Therefore the hyper oxidation of SO2 to SO3 and also its hydrolization action by atmospheric H2O to form H2SO4. Compound that falls out in acid rain effect. Such H2SO4 produced from atmosphere SO2 also has an exothermic performance which produces 500Kj/Kg of H2SO4 formed in the atmosphere. Then if we consider the critic mass of sulfur content in fossil fuels that has been consumed also contributes in a high grade to global increased temperature effect actually.
Around the world we have to check out such exothermic behavior of SO2 hyper oxidation and SO3 Hydrolization effect which also contributes to climate change indeed.

Dan
05.30.2013

Norm, I don't think we will ever have the problem of not enough CO2 given the stats above. It's the rising sea level, fresh water and O2 that is more of a concern.

Bill Arnold
05.18.2013

And to put that in context, the average carbon carbon dioxide emission rate for the entire world is 4.86 tons per capita per year. Texas produces 25.4 tons per capita per year, more than five times the world average. California produces 9.7 tons per capita per year, two times the world average. Put another way, Texas and California together have 0.9% of the world's population but emit 2.9% of the worlds carbon dioxide.

Figures for China are 18.5% of the world's population and 27.5% of the world's carbon dioxide emissions, but still only 1.3 times the world average on a per capita basis.

Norm
05.15.2013

Do you realize we all would die without adequate CO2 ?

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