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Sasol, GE pilot new water treatment technology

11.08.2013  | 

The anaerobic membrane technology will be developed at a new demonstration plant at Sasol’s research campus in Sasolburg in Free State province, the companies said today without disclosing terms.

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By RANDALL HACKLEY
Bloomberg

General Electric (GE) and Sasol are collaborating on a water-technology pilot project that will clean wastewater from plants producing synthetic fuels and chemicals and supply biogas as a byproduct for power generation.

The anaerobic membrane technology will be developed at a new demonstration plant at Sasol’s research campus in Sasolburg in Free State province, the companies said today in a statement without disclosing terms.

The development, and expected commercialization, increases the efficiencies of Sasol’s gas-to-liquids operations, said Ernst Obersholster, group executive for Sasol’s international energy division.

Sasol expects the technology to be commercially available in 2015.

The companies said the effort also aims to help limit the negative impact that South Africa’s water scarcity is having on the economy. Sasol, based in Johannesburg, is the world’s biggest producer of motor fuel from coal.



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Kate Kunkel
11.21.2013

I would be interested to know more about the technology refereed to be Jimmy Kumana.

Jimmy Kumana
11.11.2013

About 20 years ago, there was a severe drought in South Africa, and the the water level in the Vaal river had fallen to historically low levels. The Sasolburg plant was facing water supply curtailment. They developed a robust water conservation program based on reuse and internal recycle, which would have reduced fresh water intake requirements by as much as 50%. This plan was far more cost effective than the End-of-pipe WWT option. A paper was presented at the 1997 AIChE meeting, detailing this plan. But then the rains came, and the project was shelved. Now it seems that this institutional memory has been completely erased, and they are going back to a sub-optimal solution.

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