Hydrocarbon Processing Copying and distributing are prohibited without permission of the publisher
Email a friend
  • Please enter a maximum of 5 recipients. Use ; to separate more than one email address.



Nigerian oil unions defer planned refinery strike

12.31.2013  | 

Nigeria's two main oil unions halted plans to start an indefinite national strike on Jan. 1 until they meet with government officials to discuss proposals to privatize the nation's four state-owned oil refineries.

Keywords: [refining] [strike] [Nigeria] [Africa]

By CHRIS KAY

LONDON (Bloomberg) -- Nigeria's two main oil unions halted plans to start an indefinite national strike on Jan. 1 until they meet with government officials to discuss proposals to privatize the nation's four state-owned oil refineries.

The 15,000-member, manager-level Petroleum and Natural Gas Senior Staff Association of Nigeria, or Pengassan, has scheduled talks with petroleum and labor ministry officials for Jan. 7. The blue-collar National Union of Petroleum and Natural Gas Workers, or Nupeng, has not set a date for discussions, although it will "engage" with government before deciding on strike action.

"If the government does not back down," Pengassan may call strike action, which will start by halting the loading of crude cargoes and a gradual shutdown of oil and gas production, said Pengassan President Babatunde Ogun.

Nigeria, while ranking as Africa's largest oil producer, relies on fuel imports to meet more than 70% of its needs, as its 445,000 barrels a day of refining capacity operates at minimal rates because of poor maintenance and aging equipment.

Petroleum Minister Diezani Alison-Madueke said in a November interview that the Nigerian government will pursue the sale of the Port Harcourt, Warri and Kaduna refineries before the end of the first quarter of 2014.

The plan to sell the refineries is "against the overall national interest and in the interest of a few," Pengassan and Nupeng said in a December 18 joint statement. The government's plan will "transfer government monopoly to cartels that will dictate the market," the unions said.

The government's privatization plans come as Africa's richest man, Aliko Dangote, seeks to construct a $9 billion oil refinery, petrochemical and fertilizer complex in southwestern Nigeria by 2016. Mr. Dangote says the new plant will reduce Nigerian fuel imports.



Have your say
  • All comments are subject to editorial review.
    All fields are compulsory.

chibuz
12.31.2013

Let there be dialogue and concrete absolution between the govt. and the union people for the interest of the poor masses

Related articles

FEATURED EVENT


Sign-up for the Free Daily HP Enewsletter!

Boxscore Database

A searchable database of project activity in the global hydrocarbon processing industry

Poll

Should the US allow exports of crude oil? (At present, US companies can export refined products derived from crude but not the raw crude itself.)


63%

37%




View previous results

Popular Searches

Please read our Term and Conditions and Privacy Policy before using the site. All material subject to strictly enforced copyright laws.
© 2014 Hydrocarbon Processing. © 2014 Gulf Publishing Company.