December 2000

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HP Reliability: Use shock pulse methods to monitor bearings

Several modern condition monitoring devices use shock pulse techniques to determine bearing quality. One of these is Prueftechnik's VIBSCANNER, marketed in the U.S. by Miami-based Ludec..

Bloch, Heinz P., Hydrocarbon Processing Staff

Several modern condition monitoring devices use shock pulse techniques to determine bearing quality. One of these is Prueftechnik's VIBSCANNER, marketed in the U.S. by Miami-based Ludeca, Inc. (info@ludeca.com). Much more refined than other high-frequency measurements, shock pulse is widely used throughout the world as a basis for predictive maintenance. Rolling element bearings are the most common application for shock pulse, but the measurement technique has several other applications such as gear and compressor condition, and other applications where metal-to-metal contact is a source of wear. Shock pulse signals and

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