February 2000

Columns

HPIn SHE: The mysterious underworld

In Britain's north Yorkshire, there is a curious well in which the water regularly – and mysteriously – rises and falls. Not surprisingly, it is known as the Ebbing and Flowing Well. While n..

Whetton, Chris, ility Engineering

In Britain's north Yorkshire, there is a curious well in which the water regularly – and mysteriously – rises and falls. Not surprisingly, it is known as the Ebbing and Flowing Well. While no one has seen the underground structure that feeds this well, any engineer can hypothesize a system to account for this phenomenon. The most likely possibility is an underground rock chamber and siphon arrangement, such as that shown in Fig. 1. Although the siphon has been known since Classical times, the well was considered a mystery – even magic – into the early Twentieth Century. Most underground things are a mystery. Often, they can provide unexpected hazards. Un

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