May 2001

Trends and Resources

HP In Brief: HPIn Brief

FTC finds no evidence of anticompetitive conduct with last summer's gasoline price spike in the U.S. Midwest. A nine-month investigation by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) into the causes of locali..

Weirauch, Wendy, Hydrocarbon Processing Staff

FTC finds no evidence of anticompetitive conduct with last summer's gasoline price spike in the U.S. Midwest. A nine-month investigation by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) into the causes of localized high gasoline pricing reveals that a combination of factors was responsible. "There is no evidence that the price increases were a result of conspiracy or any other antitrust violation. Indeed, most of the causes were beyond the immediate control of the oil companies," according to the FTC's recently published findings. Cited factors include: high capacity utilization, low inventory levels, the choice of ethanol as an oxygenate, pipeline breaks, mis-estimation of supply, and the decision by

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