December 2015

Environment and Safety

Utilize distal flame architecture to decrease NOx emissions in combustion systems

In part, the combustion of hydrocarbon fuels is responsible for significant gains in both the quantity and quality of life, and we burn these fuels more cleanly now than at any time in history.

Colannino, J., ClearSign Combustion Corp.

In part, the combustion of hydrocarbon fuels is responsible for significant gains in both the quantity and quality of life, and we burn these fuels more cleanly now than at any time in history. However, hydrocarbon fuels do produce trace levels of pollutants, primarily nitrogen oxides (NOx), which society seeks to further reduce. Regulatory bodies all around the world are implementing increasingly strict limitations on a number of pollutants, including NOx. NOx is formed when the nitrogen (N) and oxygen (O2) in the air are exposed to very high temperatures, such as those found in industrial flames. In such cases, some N and O2 can fuse to form either NO or NO2; collectively, these two are r

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