November 2015

Regional Report

Despite Western sanctions, Russian energy projects thrive

Russia’s potential for a robust downstream sector stems from the country’s enormous oil and gas resources.

Kulkarni, P., Gulf Publishing Company

Diesel fuels produced at Gazprom Neft’s Omsk refinery (top)   are already consistent  with Euro 5 environmental standards.   Gazprom and NIPIGAZ have entered into a partnership to   increase the capacity of the Amur gas processing plant (bottom)   to 49 Bcmy. Russia’s potential for a robust downstream sector stems from the country’s enormous oil and gas resources. The vast country that spans two continents is the world’s largest producer of crude and condensate (80 Bbbl in reserves and 10.9 MMbpd in production), and the second-largest producer of natural gas (1.69 Tcf in reserves and 64 Bcfd in production). Nevertheless, the downstream industry has yet to fulfill

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