June 2016

Trends and Resources

Innovations

Unintended fugitive emissions from pressurized plant components have long been a key concern for operators as well as regulators.

Andrew, Bob, Hydrocarbon Processing Staff

Fugitive emissions testing of PRVs Unintended fugitive emissions from pressurized plant components have long been a key concern for operators as well as regulators. Fugitive emissions can be hazardous, can contribute to atmospheric pollution, and can represent an economic loss for the plant. Since the number of potential leak sources at large industrial facilities can be numerous and difficult to identify, controlling fugitive emissions is challenging, especially for valves. FIG. 1. Pilot-operated relief valve (left) and spring-operated relief valve (right) used in a fugitive emissions testing program. Bolted and threaded components and featur

Log in to view this article.

Not Yet A Subscriber? Here are Your Options.

1) Start a FREE TRIAL SUBSCRIPTION and gain access to all articles in the current issue of Hydrocarbon Processing magazine.

2) SUBSCRIBE to Hydrocarbon Processing magazine in print or digital format and gain ACCESS to the current issue as well as to 3 articles from the HP archives per month. $399 for an annual subscription*.

3) Start a FULL ACCESS PLAN SUBSCRIPTION and regain ACCESS to this article, the current issue, all past issues in the HP Archive, the HP Process Handbooks, HP Market Data, and more. $1,995 for an annual subscription.  For information about group rates or multi-year terms, contact J'Nette Davis-Nichols at Jnette.Davis-Nichols@GulfEnergyInfo.com or +1 713.520.4426*.

*Access will be granted the next business day.

Related Articles

From the Archive

Comments

Comments

{{ error }}
{{ comment.comment.Name }} • {{ comment.timeAgo }}
{{ comment.comment.Text }}