November 2018

Process Optimization

Reconstruct a vacuum column injector system using computer modeling—Part 2

Steam ejector vacuum systems are the most common means of creating and maintaining a vacuum in the process units of oil and gas processing facilities.

Telyakov, E. S., Osipov, E. V., Bugembe, D., Kazan National Research Technological University

Steam ejector vacuum systems are the most common means of creating and maintaining a vacuum in the process units of oil and gas processing facilities. This is due to the simplicity of the structure, the lack of moving parts and low repair and maintenance costs. Conversely, the main disadvantages of steam ejector pumps (SEPs) are the large component dimensions, noisy operation and high consumption of high-pressure steam and recycled cool water. In Part 1 of this article, which appeared in the October issue, the main elements of the vacuum unit for separating fuel oil from the primary distillation unit—the main vacuum column, furnace, ejectors, intermediate capacitors, separators, etc.—were s

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