February 2007

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HP Viewpoint: Synthetic Fischer-Tropsch fuels gain acceptance

In Sept. 19, 2006, the US Air Force and Syntroleum Corp. achieved a major milestone. A synthetic Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuel powered a B-52 Stratofortress airplane for the first time. In this test, two ..

Agee, K., Syntroleum Corp.

In Sept. 19, 2006, the US Air Force and Syntroleum Corp. achieved a major milestone. A synthetic Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuel powered a B-52 Stratofortress airplane for the first time. In this test, two of the bomber's engines ran on a 50–50 blend of conventional fuel and Syntroleum's FT jet fuel. According to the US Air Force, the engines powered by the synthetic FT jet fuel ran well. This is an important step in the pursuit of alternative fuels for aviation and transportation needs. Early synfuels. The FT process converts syngas (a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide) to hydrocarbons. The technology was originally developed and commercialized in Germany before World War II. By the

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