February 2017

Process Optimization

Reduce coke formation and save operating costs with optimization of DMDS into ethane cracking furnaces

Steam cracking furnaces produce olefins, which are high-value feeds in the petrochemical industry. Coke formation is an unavoidable part of a thermal cracking furnace.

Hay, G., Rasouli, G., Carbognani-Arambarri, L., Virtual Materials Group Inc.; Suzuki, R., Urata, K., Inoue, M., JX Nippon

Steam cracking furnaces produce olefins, which are high-value feeds in the petrochemical industry. Coke formation is an unavoidable part of a thermal cracking furnace. The amount of coke created depends on feed quality, operating conditions and the metal surface of the coil. Coke can be generated through different mechanisms, but the most important are catalytic and asymptotic, or pyrolytic, mechanisms.1 In the catalytic mechanism, the metal surface of the tube coils (containing Fe-Ni) works as a catalyst and enhances coke formation. After the metal surface is deactivated by a layer of catalytic coke deposition, then the pyrolytic coke can be formed on top of this initial coke layer. Coke p

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