July 2019

Valves, Pumps and Turbomachinery

Measure and predict torsional vibration in rotating equipment

Excessive torsional vibration in rotating equipment trains can result in damage to, or failure of, equipment, leading to emergency shutdowns and costly downtime.

Pettinato, B., Wang, Q., Elliott Group

Excessive torsional vibration in rotating equipment trains can result in damage to, or failure of, equipment, leading to emergency shutdowns and costly downtime. It also increases the potential for major safety incidents, such as turbine overspeed events or coupling failures that generate dangerous shrapnel, as shown in FIG. 1. FIG. 1. Failed diaphragm coupling.  When designing a torsional system, engineers typically use comprehensive torsional vibration analysis to avoid excessive vibration. API Standard 617, which specifies torsional system requirements, specifies a 10% separation margin between torsional natural frequencies (TNFs) and any ex

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