Axens/Sulzer GTC Technology alliance delivers advanced FCC naphtha processing solution

Axens, an international provider of process technologies, catalysts, adsorbents and services and Sulzer Chemtech (GTC Technology), a global licensor of refinery and petrochemical process technologies, have formed an alliance to license an advanced process for FCC (fluid catalytic cracking) naphtha processing. The combined offering is based on Axens’ Prime-G+® hydrodesulfurization technology and Sulzer Chemtech’s GT-BTX PluS® extraction technology.

Axens Prime-G+® technology is by far the leading technology for FCC gasoline selective desulfurization with more than 300 references worldwide and Sulzer Chemtech is incontestably positioned as the leader for aromatics recovery for downstream FCC applications through its extractive distillation technology GT- BTX PluS®. The combined solution of both technologies brings outstanding advantages for the gasoline and the petrochemical segments.

The combination of Prime-G+® and GT-BTX PluS® offers a unique solution to reduce octane loss to a very low level for the gasoline pool. The technology is especially important in countries that are upgrading fuel specifications to meet environmental requirements, and it can be applied in new, or retrofits of existing units in operation to maximize profit.

Axens Prime-G+® technology is by far the leading technology for FCC gasoline selective desulfurization with more than 300 references worldwide and Sulzer Chemtech is incontestably positioned as the leader for aromatics recovery for downstream FCC applications through its extractive distillation technology GT- BTX PluS®. The combined solution of both technologies brings outstanding advantages for the gasoline and the petrochemical segments.

On the other hand, it provides refiners the option of converting FCC gasoline into petrochemical products – BTX and additional propylene – and get additional margin in regions where gasoline demand is not sufficient. For those, the combined offer can convert their excess gasoline into petrochemical products to adapt to the market change with minimum investment.

 

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