February 2011

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HP Control: Inferential control model input selection

It is not a secret that I prefer to base inferential models on engineering principles, rather than on regression. Having said that, the use of regression is widespread, and being a consultant in the f..

Friedman, Y. Z., Petrocontrol

It is not a secret that I prefer to base inferential models on engineering principles, rather than on regression. Having said that, the use of regression is widespread, and being a consultant in the field, I am often asked about how inferential model performance can be improved. Indeed it can be much improved, if one only took the trouble to consider chemical engineering principles. Example. A classic example of bad input selection is a set of input variables that contain intensive variables, such as pressures and temperatures, together with extensive variables such as flows. The fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) fractionator (Fig. 1) will serve to illustrate this point. To infer the naphtha

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