January 2012

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HP Integration Strategies: Inline blending can help process plants cut costs and reduce quality give-away

In a traditional batch-blending process, the final product composition is created by combining different intermediate products (held in storage tanks) in a blend tank. The objective is to create final..

Crisafulli, K., ARC Advisory Group

In a traditional batch-blending process, the final product composition is created by combining different intermediate products (held in storage tanks) in a blend tank. The objective is to create final products that meet customer specifications. However, in many process manufacturing applications, tankless, inline blending may provide a better solution, particularly in grassroots process plants or for expansion projects in existing plants. Inline blending involves continuous mixing of two or more intermediate products using flowmeters and control valves, to obtain a final product of strictly defined proportions. In theory, inline blending could enable process plants to save money by reduci

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