October 2017

Environment and Safety

Design atmospheric aboveground storage tanks for accident prevention

The design and construction of oil, gas and petrochemical facilities is continuously improving, as increasing compliance with ever-changing codes and standards, such as the American Petroleum Institute (API) and the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), is resulting in fewer atmospheric above-ground storage tank (AAST) accidents.

Zardynezhad, S., Contributing Writer

The design and construction of oil, gas and petrochemical facilities is continuously improving, as increasing compliance with ever-changing codes and standards, such as the American Petroleum Institute (API) and the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), is resulting in fewer atmospheric above-ground storage tank (AAST) accidents. The frequency of tank accidents has decreased with better design considerations and improved inspection, operation and maintenance activities, but fires and other incidents still occur. Due to the size of most AASTs, fire accidents involving large AASTs carry increased consequences in terms of cost, property damage, health, safety and environmental impacts,

Log in to view this article.

Not Yet A Subscriber? Here are Your Options.

1) Start a FREE TRIAL SUBSCRIPTION and gain access to all articles in the current issue of Hydrocarbon Processing magazine.

2) SUBSCRIBE to Hydrocarbon Processing magazine in print or digital format and gain IMMEDIATE ACCESS to the current issue as well as to 3 articles from the HP archives per month. $399 for an annual subscription.

3) Start a FULL ACCESS PLAN SUBSCRIPTION and regain IMMEDIATE ACCESS to this article, the current issue, all past issues in the HP Archive, the HP Process Handbooks, HP Market Data, and more. $1,695 for an annual subscription.  For information about group rates or multi-year terms, contact J'Nette Davis-Nichols at  jnette.davis-nichols@gulfpub.com or +1 713.520.4426.

Related Articles

From the Archive

Comments