Fluor completes installation of two major structures at Dow’s new polymers manufacturing unit

The skyline of Freeport, Texas has a new look as Fluor iron workers, riggers and operators recently completed the installation of two major structures at Dow’s new polymers manufacturing unit. Fluor is currently performing mechanical construction on the unit.

 The two structures total almost 5,000 tons of steel – the equivalent of 3,000 average-sized cars.
The two structures total almost 5,000 tons of steel – the equivalent of 3,000 average-sized cars.

Over a two-week period, the Dow and Fluor team safely erected a 280-foot-tall structure and a 300-foot-tall structure that make up portions of the facility. The two structures total almost 5,000 tons of steel – the equivalent of 3,000 average-sized cars.

“The success of the lifts and the project is due to the team mentality of everyone on the project,” said Rocky Plemons, vice president of construction and site director for Fluor. “This team is the best at finding solutions to a challenge and being accountable. It truly is our people who make the difference.”

The two structures were initially assembled into 12 different components at the site. This pre-assembly phase reduced the schedule from traditional stick-build methods by enabling the components to be assembled simultaneously. In addition, it improved safety by reducing the level of elevated work and minimizing site congestion.

The components were then transported to their final location by self-propelled module transporters, and through 12 lifts, connected together like building blocks.

“I get to work with 500 world-class construction professionals every day,” Plemons said. “Cam Gay, our construction manager, has set the bar high, held people accountable to expectations and together we are continuing to meet or exceed our goals.”

The project is on schedule for mechanical completion in 2018. Once completed, the facility will manufacture polyolefin elastomers for applications in packaging, transportation, infrastructure and consumer markets.

From the Archive

Comments